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There was an interesting article in while back in INC Magazine on motivating employees. The article contained a lot of sound advice. However, an owner or manager is not always around to motivate staff or they may not always have time. Also, who is going to motivate management so they can motivate the employees?

While motivation from managers and owners always helps, if you want to perform well, you need to motive yourself; no matter what position you may hold in the company. So here are some ideas on how to stay motivated, rather than waiting for someone else to come along and help with that.

Rewards You can reward yourself when you do something well or finish a task. As I work for myself, I have a reward system in place for when I complete a project. It may be something small, such as reading a chapter of a book or talking a short walk. If it is a big project, I may take myself out to lunch.

You can give yourself points that can be accumulated until you reach a pre-decided goal.

Create a Goal Most people work better when they are working towards their own goals rather than someone else’s. Decide what goals you want to accomplish today, this week or this year. Goals can be big or small. You may create a personal goal for the month as well as a daily goal. Your goal may be to start or finish a task that you don’t particularly want to do or have been putting off. There is always a certain satisfaction when something gets done.

Think Beyond Your Job Ask questions about the overall goals of the company. Find out what part you can play in making these goals a reality. Talk to your manager about your work goals and how they can benefit the company.

When motivation comes from the inside it is more rewarding and you will be happier for it. You know when you have done a good job and so do your customers.

I encourage managers and owners to notice when staff members stay motivated, especially in times that are frustrating or disappointing.

A tip of the glass from me to you.

Elizabeth SlaterE Column
by Elizabeth “E” Slater, In Short Direct Marketing

A recognized expert in the fields of direct marketing and sales in the wine marketplace. Slater has taught more wineries and winery associations how to create and improve the effectiveness of their direct marketing programs and to make the most of each customer’s potential than anyone in the wine industry today.

Follow E on twitter @esavant and facebook.

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