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As human beings we understand that in many ways we are all very much alike. We have the same basic needs for air, water, food, sunshine, etc. However, we like to think of ourselves as individuals and that we are unlike anyone else. In a word: unique.

While many businesses, small and large, would prefer that people walk into their business love their products, buy lots of them, stay connected and continue to buy for years to come…that’s not usually how it works. As customers, we are overloaded with different avenues through which we can buy products and one of the few things that makes one business stand out from another is service. How customers are treated when they choose to do business with us is the most important thing to them.

Treating each guest or customer who shows an interest in your products or business as an individual, with distinct differences from others, is the best way to create more long-term customers and increase their dependency on your products.

The level of interaction that customers wish to have with your products or business varies by the type of product you have. If you do not wish to have lots of personal interaction with customers, stick to products that are more utilitarian. For example, if I buy a different dish washing soap and I don’t particularly like it, I will still probably use it until it is gone, and it won’t affect my life too much.

However, if I am having an important dinner party and I buy a wine that does not suit the food I have prepared or find the wine is corked, the negative consequences may be more pronounced.

Think about the people who buy wine from you and the way you think about your wines. If you think your wines are special, remember that your customers are too. It is a rare winery that doesn’t think that the wines they make are a cut above the rest. If you think about your customers the same way you will use the same care and attention when interacting with your customers as you do with your wines.

Next week the blog will continue to talk about the different consumer categories and how to sell to them.

A tip of the glass from me to you.

Elizabeth SlaterE Column
by Elizabeth “E” Slater, In Short Direct Marketing

A recognized expert in the fields of direct marketing and sales in the wine marketplace. Slater has taught more wineries and winery associations how to create and improve the effectiveness of their direct marketing programs and to make the most of each customer’s potential than anyone in the wine industry today.

Follow E on twitter @esavant and facebook.

 
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